NCWR

About NCWR

Water resources

In a nutshell

Time for inquiry and some field work in order to “discover” the  water resources of your area.

Our objectives

In this activity you will:

  • Learn about the “traditional” (or “conventional”) water resources as well as the “alternative” (or “non-conventional”) ones.
  • Organise a field visit in order to map the water resources of your area.

Things to use

A map of your region, notebook and pencils, camera or mobile phone (to take pictures/video)

Play & learn

Can you recognize the various sounds of water? Listen and match the sound with its source.

A: water resource

B: sound

  • 1 Stream 1
  • 2 Rain 2
  • 3 Waves 3
  • 4 Walking on the snow 4
  • 5 Water drop 5
  • 1 1
  • 2 2
  • 3 3
  • 4 4
  • 5 5

Water-readings

The conventional water resources

We use the term “water resource” useully to describe any natural source of freshwater that is, or can be used by humans. Surface waters such as lakes, rivers, wetlands, streams, etc. are the water resources we can immediately identify. Another important resource is groundwater located below the earth’s surface at a depth varying from a few meters to several hundredths of meters. Groundwaters often find their way out to the surface by spilling from natural springs, mainly in mountains. Since the ancient times people have tried to acess groundwater by digging wells, and recently boreholes. Rain and all types of   are important water resources that enrich both surface and underground waters.

Based on the above, the term conventional water resources describes the natural sources of freshwater; but does not apply for the artificial works that people construct to secure it. For example, the desalination plants, the dams and the artificial lakes are not considered as a natural resource.

 

Stop and wonder

GROUP DISCUSSION


If water coming from rivers, lakes and springs are considered as a “conventional” resources,  what might a “non-conventional” resource be?

  • Brainstorm with your classmates what that term refer to.
  • Where does this water come from?  To give you a hint, one of these “non-conventional” water resources is very old, it has been practiced in many islands of the Mediterranean for centruries.

Water-readings

The non-conventional water resources

With natural water supplies no longer meeting the growing demand in several countries throughout the Mediterranean region, non-conventional water resources are increasingly becoming an additional contributor to water availability. Let’s see what these sources are:

  • Rainwater harvesting: This is a century-old practice in many arid areas such as the islands and the coastal settlements.
  • Greywater recycling: Water from the bathtub, the washbasin and the washing machine (soapy water) after its proper treatment can be used, for example, in flushing the toilet.
  • Wastewater recycling: Urban wastewater coming from households and other buildings can be treated and reused i.e. in irrigation.
  • Desalination of sea or brackish water: Though thus method is relatively costly in terms of energy, and has a high carbon footprint, it is indispensable for several dry islands and countries of the Mediterranean and beyond.

Discussion Points


  1. Which of the above “alternative” water resources needs less processes to produce water?
  2. Which of them requires more energy?
  3. Which of the above is possible to have in your school?
  4. Which of the above is possible to have in your home?

Play & Learn

Based on what you have read so far, which of the following is a "conventional water resource"?

This is salty water not fresh!

Lakes are important water resources.

This is not a natural freshwater resource

Streams are water resources.

This is a manmade construction for collecting water

Group activity

Let’s discover the water resources of our area

  1. Observe a physical map of your area (printed or e-map).
  2. Pin on the map the water-spots (resources) you would like to visit. Such water-spots can be both “conventional” and “non conventional” ones:  springs, reservoirs, streams & rivers, lakes, but also fountains, desalination plants etc. are typical examples of such water-spots.
  3. Chart the path you will follow on the map , and rganize a visit to the water resources. Don’t forget to fill in the worksheet during your visit.
  4. What signs of human activities (if any) do you observe around the water-spots, e.g. are there any crops, handicrafts, factories, roads, hotels, etc.?
  5. For each water resource that you identify, ask how its water is used. Do you detect any problem of pollution or depletion?
  6. Take pictures of the water resources, the landscape, etc.
  7. Back in class, work in gorups to make your own “water map” to present your findings to your school-mates.

Water shares

Take a photo of your water map and upload it here  


Water meter

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Way forward

Dive in…

Climate change challenges if you want to do see how climate change affects water resources

The water cycle in a bowl! if you want to find out more about the hydrological cycle

Go back to the homepage!

The water basins

Water in the city

Desalination

Do you know about grey water?

Rainwater harvesting

Greywater recycling in practice

Wastewater treatment

The water cycle in a bowl!

Waterworks through time

Climate change challenges

Rainwater Harvesting Systems in practice

Reduce-Reuse-Recycle

Water resources

Where do I begin?

The water basins

In this activity we learn what a water drainage basin is and why it is important for the experts to study it.

Continue!

Water in the city

What is the "urban water cycle"? Which are the important aspects of water management within a city environment?

Continue!

Desalination

Let's find out how sea and brakish water can become a freshwater resource!

Continue!

Do you know about grey water?

Let's find out what "greywater” is and how we can use it!

Continue!

Rainwater harvesting

Can we collect rainwater? And how to use it? Let's find out!

Continue!

Greywater recycling in practice

How a grewywater system is installed? Let's find out!

Continue!

Wastewater treatment

In this activity we are informed about how wastewater is treated and what we can do with the treated wastewater.

Continue!

The water cycle in a bowl!

Let's travel within the water cycle!

Continue!

Waterworks through time

Let's discover the story behind the historic fountains, cisterns and aqueducts of our town!

Continue!

Climate change challenges

Time to discuss about climate change, causes and impact and how we can cope with it.

Continue!

Rainwater Harvesting Systems in practice

What are the various types of rainwater harvesting systems? Let's find out more about them!

Continue!

Reduce-Reuse-Recycle

What is my water footprint and how can I reduce it?

Continue!

Water resources

Discovering the water resources of our region.

Continue!

Where do I begin?

Let's see why it is important to know about water in our region.

Continue!